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Archive for the ‘American Sociological Association (ASA) Style Guide, 6th Edition’ Category

D5

Please answer any 2 of the following questions:



1. Please discuss whether your findings on the YouTube videos and ads support or detract from arguments made in the Chapter 7 text section 'Imitation of Violence'.

2. *For the social comparison on social media article, compare rumination to self reflection, discuss which is better for identity formation and why?

3. We all have implicit biases. As you learned about implicit bias, what areas of life do you think you may need to be more aware of your thoughts? What are ways to mitigate these thought and ideas?

4. Think about all the readings about how our life, beliefs, behavior and values are socially constructed.  You may want to refer back to module 4 and my review of the ISL readings thus far.  How does social media construct our social life and social being? Use examples from the unit and from life.


NOTES:

Attachments

The Presentation of Self in Virtual Spaces sum

Rebuttal

INITIAL ANSWER:
One of the standard steps in producing a scientifically verifiable research study is to conduct a review of the existing literature.  However, as we debated in the first Discussion, authority and documentation are sources of knowledge that may have their weaknesses.  Written treatises are not infallible and may lack the empiricism and objectivity of the scientific method.  Even if they are based on observable evidence and follow the scientific method, part of the literature review process is to critique the studies and potentially find flaws or gaps that were not addressed.  So, why do we do this in the first place?

1). Describe the multitude of reasons we conduct a literature review, from determining what was already discovered; to developing a theoretical framework; to finding flaws in the instrumentation, validity, reliability, and analysis and interpretation of data; and finding gaps in the literature.  How does this position us as

A Reply needed, Only 3 rebuttles are needed

One of the standard steps in producing a scientifically verifiable research study is to conduct a review of the existing literature.  However, as we debated in the first Discussion, authority and documentation are sources of knowledge that may have their weaknesses.  Written treatises are not infallible and may lack the empiricism and objectivity of the scientific method.  Even if they are based on observable evidence and follow the scientific method, part of the literature review process is to critique the studies and potentially find flaws or gaps that were not addressed.  So, why do we do this in the first place?

1) Describe the multitude of reasons we conduct a literature review, from determining what was already discovered; to developing a theoretical framework; to finding flaw in the instrumentation, validity, reliability, and analysis and interpretation of data; and finding gaps  in the literature.  How does this position us as researchers to

A Reply needed, Only a rebuttle is needed

How could you design a bystander intervention in your workplace for sexual harassment?

As a student of both sociology and psychology, I have found myself to be a firm believer in symbolic interactions and subsequently the social learning theory. This is not to say that what we learn from our role models is set in stone. I believe there is a fluidity in the types of people we choose to emulate based upon exposure to new experiences. What appears to be somewhat difficult to establish within the examples of intervention relating to sexual harassment is the effectiveness over time. 

Lets begin with the problem: sexual harassment. A survey of employees should signify the strengths and weaknesses within the workplace and therefore give us an opportunity to address behaviors that may be interpreted as acceptable norms but are sexually aggressive in nature. The stakeholders in the intervention of these behaviors include the company itself, as it would want to legally prote

Comprehensive Essay

You should answer one question from Group A and one question from Group B.

You are free to use any outside sources you wish for this exam; however, you must properly cite your sources according to American Sociological Association (ASA) style guidelines. You should also provide a reference section that includes all works cited in this portion of your exam. This reference section should adhere to ASA style guidelines.

Each question is worth up to 200 points. Of these 200 points, up to 170 points will be awarded for substance. To get the full 170 points, your answer must draw upon at least three outside scholarly sources (i.e., peer-reviewed journal articles or scholarly books, not counting your textbook, Wikipedia, etc.). Up to 30 points will be based upon adherence to ASA style for your in-text citations and reference list. (These points will be awarded as follows: no ASA style errors = 30 points; the minimal number of minor ASA errors = 24 points; multiple numbers of mi

Naomi Klein

What are your thoughts about Naomi Klein's analysis of capitalism and its impact on society and the environment?

How do you think her ideas about capitalism and about the ability of people to affect social change compare to some of the theorists we have studied this semester?

NOTES:
Social theory purists might ask why I included Naomi Klein in an applied sociological theory course? After all, she is not a sociologist and not really a social theorist in the traditional sense. She is, however, a very perceptive observer of the contemporary world who raises questions that touch upon some of the most important themes we have discused in this course -- among them capitalism and its impact on society, social structures and the ability of people to initiate social change. Naomi Klein is stinging in her critique of the impact of capitalism, yet refuses to give up to nihilistic despair. She sees the world facing a crisis and believes that crisis could give rise to a new, more

Putting It All Together

Respond to the following discussion prompts

What items in the sociological tool kit might prove especially useful in conducting a needs assessment for a school?

Discuss the difference between program evaluations that measure progress against goals and those that measure capacity development.

Which type do you think is most needed for the schools in your community -- and why?



Helpful Links:
https://www.betterevaluation.org/en/themes/capacitydevelopment

https://opentextbc.ca/introductiontosociology2ndedition/chapter/chapter-2-sociological-research/

https://opentextbc.ca/introductiontosociology/chapter/chapter2-sociological-research/


Lets Talk Theory

How do sociologists use theory?
And what do you think about Lieberson's ideas about the use of evidence in testing sociological theory?

Notes for answering the questions:
Einstein, Renoir, and Greeley: Some Thoughts about Evidence in Sociology: 1991 Presidential Address (UPLOAD)

BARKING UP THE WRONG BRANCH: ScientificAlternatives to the Current Model of sociological Science (UPLOAD)

Chapter 3, The Role of Theory in Sociological Practice in Doing Sociology.
(UPLOAD)



Reference(s):
Chapter 3, The Role of Theory in Sociological Practice in Doing Sociology.

Lieberson, Stanley. 1991. Einstein, Renoir, and Greeley: Some Thoughts About Evidence in Sociology. American Sociological Review 57 (1): 1 15.

Liberson, Stanley, and Freda B. Lynn. 2002. Barking up the Wrong Branch: Scientific Alternatives to the Current Model of Sociological Science.  Annual Review of Sociology 28: 1 19.

Sociological Practice

Questi9on(s):

Respond to one of the following discussion prompts.
What are your thoughts on the tools of sociology (perspective, theories, concepts, methods) and their impact on sociological practice?

Discuss the applied sociological enterprise in the information age and the role played by applied sociologists and basic researchers.


Answering Material:

https://plato.stanford.edu/index.html

Applied Sociology in an Information Age
Most of us toss around the term information age when describing the contemporary world, but as sociologists, our interest in this term should go much deeper than mere semantic shorthand for the times in which we live. For, this is an age where information has truly become a commodity. Our economic and social structures depend upon it, just as they relied upon iron, coal, and later petroleum in the industrial age.

The information has become the essential raw ingredient in a chain of production that goes from

Max Weber part 1

Questi9on(s):
So, what are your reactions to Max Weber?
Any concepts that resonate with you?
Any that seem way off base?



Answering Material:
https://prezi.com/ubbdczh9sjzq/copy-of-max-weber/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Macfarlane on Max Weber:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNC3Ur2Uc6A&feature=youtu.be

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/weber/




Reference(s):
Edles, Laura Desfor, and Scott Appelrouth. 2010. Sociological Theory in the Classical Era. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.

Grenfell, Michael James (ed). 2012. Pierre Bourdieu: Key Concepts. New York: Routledge.

pages 153 - 162 (biographical sketch, intellectual influences, and core ideas); 167 - 181 (Protestant ethic and the spirit of capitalism); and 201 - 220 (the types of legitimate domination).